Sarcopenic obesity (a phrase coined in 2000) is difficult to easily detect

Over the next 20 years, the aging of the population and obesity epidemic will collide. These two aircraft carriers of health burden are expected to lead to the nation’s growing health issues. First, aging is associated with a dramatic and progressive loss of muscle mass and quality, which partly leads to a diminished functional ability, increased susceptibility to disease and a declining physical quality of life leading to the possibility of physical dependence. Individuals who lose significant muscle mass are considered to be sarcopenic and, as a result, they typically have low appendicular lean mass relative to body height. Second, advancing age leads to their increased susceptibility to weight gain that contributes to development of obesity, along with a host of cardiovascular, metabolic and functional consequences. Accordingly, there has been a rising concern that older adults who possess both low amounts of appendicular muscle and high levels of adipose tissue are particularly vulnerable to physical disability and health consequences. Low levels of muscle relative to the total fat mass clearly predisposes to metabolic dysregulation and biomechanical disadvantages in performing tasks of daily life against gravity (e.g., stair climbing, chair rising, etc…
 
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